Driver

SCHEIDER'S ICE DRIVING SCHOOL WITH A DIFFERENCE

Wednesday 11th of December 2019

It might be the off-season for the FIA World Rallycross Championship, but many of the team’s and driver’s are as busy as ever, both competing in different events to keep themselves sharp and working behind the scenes on other projects.

Germany’s Timo Scheider, who drove for the ALL-INKL.COM Muennich Motorsport team in World RX 2019, has set up an ice driving school in Scandinavia, called TripleX Adventures. “I started this because I love going sideways, I love cars and I felt in Love with Swedish Lapland," he said.

"On ice all your driving input show you directly if you did it right or not. There’s nothing that compares to the feedback you get on ice. The more you do, the better it is. I’m learning every time I go out on the lake and I try to use every moment I can get to improve my skills and feeling.”

Ice driving schools are not unusual in Scandinavia. But what make’s Scheider’s project different is that he had modelled the ice circuits on real circuits from the World Rallycross Championship, using GPS technology to measure the real-life tracks, which he says helps teach a range of driving techniques, using his purpose-built TS Motorsport Audi RS3 rally cars.

“When we started to think about layouts it came up quickly that maybe rallycross track layouts could be cool. We will have Montalegre and Holjes as rallycross layouts, and two more tracks made from our minds. When you go on ice teaching people you need to think what kind of corners you need to teach it in the best possible way.

"You need all kind of corners – slow, medium and high speed Montalegre and Holjes combine all of this. Our tracks are 100% the same corner radius as the real tracks but as you can imagine, we can’t provide the banking.

"All of the tracks are 100% measured by GPS and we will drive them clockwise and anti-clockwise, plus we will have night sessions. Ice driving makes me a better RX driver because I train my brain and ass sensors ... that helps a lot when you need to find the last tenths and hundreds."

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